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These bullies should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. This 14 year old suffered humiliation that he will carry with him for life. I have to tolerance for bullies. My son has been bullied and the bully was caught in the act so I know what kids can go through at the hands of these bullies. The thing is, these bullies must be cowards that have a lack of self esteem or possibly suffer from a tiny penis. Below is the article I read regarding this incident.

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Boy, 14, Allegedly Tattooed Against His Will By Bullies

by Tom Henderson May 24th 2010 6:30PM

A 14-year-old boy in Concord, N.H., claims he was bullied into getting a tattoo on his buttocks May 10.

His father tells the local paper, the New Hampshire Union Leader, that bullies at Concord High School threatened to beat the boy if he didn’t submit to the tattoo.

According to the father, the boy has attention deficit disorder and has been habitually bullied by older students.

The bullies allegedly told him they would quit harassing him if he got a tattoo showing the outline of a male sex organ and offensive terms. If he refused to get the tattoo, the father tells the paper, they vowed to “kick the crap out of him.”

The father and mother reportedly learned what happened two days later after a teacher overheard students talking about the incident in the hall. Cell phone images of the tattoo have also been circulating, the father tells the Union Leader.

“Honestly, when I heard this on the phone, I was so distraught, I left work immediately,” the father tells the paper.

The parents took the boy to a doctor to be checked out, and while he is physically fine, it will cost thousands of dollars to remove the tattoo.

Teachers reportedly want to pay for the laser treatments, but the dad has other ideas.

“I think the kids should pay for the laser removal,” he tells the paper.

Charged in the incident are Blake VanNest, Donald “D.J.” Wyman, Ryan Fisk and Travis Johnston. None of the suspects are juveniles. Police tell the Union Leader a 15-year-old juvenile — who allegedly bought the tattoo gun for $30 as a souvenir — also will be charged.

VanNest was charged with two counts of simple assault, endangering the welfare of a minor, tattooing without a license, indecent exposure, criminal threatening and breach of bail.

Fisk was charged with two counts of simple assault, endangering the welfare of a minor, tattooing without a license, sale of a controlled drug, criminal threatening and breach of bail.

Wyman was charged with conspiracy to commit criminal liability for the conduct of another and conspiracy to endanger the welfare of a minor.

Johnson was charged with conspiracy to endanger the welfare of a minor.

Fisk allegedly did the actual tattooing. When he was done, he and the others reportedly took the boy outside Johnston’s home where a group of students waited to look and laugh while the victim was forced to drop his pants. Fisk allegedly gave the victim a bag of marijuana as payment for the humiliation.

According to court documents, VanNest told police the tattoo was his idea and admitted that he preyed on the younger, unpopular and frequently picked-on boy.

Tragically, this incident could likely have been avoided, Dr. Michele Borba, an educational psychologist who has written 23 books on parenting, tells ParentDish.

Borba keeps a picture of an 11-year-old boy who was bullied to death in her pocket as a reminder of what can happen when bullying goes unchecked.

Adults need to spot the warning signs of bullying, she says. The problem almost always starts gradually and escalates.

“That’s the cold-blooded viciousness of it,” she says.

Notice the alleged bullies in this case threatened to “stop” if the victim got the tattoo, Borba says. That means he had been tormented for some time. And kids knew it: That’s why they were talking about it in the halls. That’s why there was an audience waiting for him to drop his pants.

“Kids always talk,” Borba says. “There’s always a grapevine that gets through.”

She suggests schools offer anonymous tip boxes to be alerted to bullies. The trick is to make a general comment box, she adds, so kids won’t be afraid to be seen dropping in notes.

Researchers at the University of Toronto did a study on bullying to find out who are the most likely targets and found bullies will pick on just about any mental or physical difference they can find.

Parents should try to pinpoint such vulnerabilities first, Borba says.

“What parents need to do is get in the shoes of the kid,” she says.

That way, she adds, parents and children can rehearse responses and comebacks that diffuse bullies rather than giving them the emotional reactions they crave.

“We need to teach kids these comebacks also as a life skill,” Borba says.

Kids also need to learn to stay safe by avoiding isolated bathrooms, locker areas and other places where bullies can do their business away from watchful adults, Borba says. For example, she adds, kids can sit to the school bus driver’s immediate right — the most defensible position on the bus.

Borba also says kids need safe havens at school where they can turn in times of trouble. This could be the school nurse or their beloved band director. They must have someone and someplace to go to when parents aren’t available, she says.

“Someone needs to be the listener,” Borba says. “Our kids need someone to be their hero or savior.”

The tattoo victim’s father tells the Union Leader his son was handling the incident well until it became public.

“He’s overwhelmed with it,” he says.

The parents of his son’s girlfriend reportedly called to say they don’t want the boy contacting her anymore.

“I respect her parents’ wishes, but it wasn’t his fault,” the father says. “He’s lost his first love over this.”

Related: When Your Child Is the Bully

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What a way to honor our Marines. An outstanding Sheriff Deputy was fired for having a tattoo on the inside of his forearm of praying hands and dog tags. He and his platoon lost one of their own while serving in Iraq and the entire platoon got the same tattoo in memory of the soldier. I would say the Sheriff needs to revise his tattoo policy. They hired him knowing he had the tattoo and fired him without due process after he served his probation period.

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Parkersburg News article link

Wood County deputy fired over tattoo
Natalee Seely
POSTED: April 29, 2010

PARKERSBURG – A former Wood County deputy is fighting for his job after being fired in April over a tattoo on his forearm.

Christopher Piggott, a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and former Parkersburg firefighter, said the circumstances of his termination were unfair and his right to due process was violated.

“I’m not ready to give up my career in law enforcement. Being a deputy is something I’ve pursued all my life,” said 29-year-old Piggott. “This whole situation has dumbfounded a lot of people.”

Piggott received a letter of termination April 15, a little over a year after being hired by the Wood County Sheriff’s Office and 11 days after the conclusion of his year-long probationary period, he said.

The termination was over Piggott’s refusal to remove a tattoo on his right forearm depicting two praying hands cupping a Marine Corps ID tag, an image memorializing his five years of service in the armed forces and his two tours of service in Iraq.

Above the hands is the phrase “Unless you were there,” etched in ink.


In 2008, the sheriff’s office implemented a new policy restricting visible tattoos. The policy states, “Tattoos are not to be visible while wearing the summer uniform.”

During his time as a deputy sheriff, Piggott said he covered the tattoo while on duty by wrapping a fitted black band around his forearm or wearing a long-sleeved uniform.

When asked to have the tattoo removed, Piggott refused. A few days later he was terminated, found to be in violation of the rules of conduct and personal appearance, he said.

“I was terminated rather quickly, and no due process was given,” said Piggott. “I feel it was dealt with in an unprofessional way.”

Piggott declined to confirm whether he signed any documentation when hired about agreeing to have his tattoo removed within a certain time frame.

Officials with the Wood County Deputy Sheriff’s Association said the heart of the issue is the violation of the former deputy’s right to a board review before his termination.

Lt. Shawn Graham, president of the Wood County Deputy Sheriff’s Association, said once a deputy’s probationary period has ended, he should be given the right to due process. Citing West Virginia Code 7-14-C, Graham said punitive issues should be presented to a review board before action is taken.

“We feel he was fired without proper procedure. The deputy sheriff’s association held a meeting on his behalf and voted to support Chris and try to get his job back,” said Graham. “I think we are doing what is in the best interest of the citizens. To lose one of our best officers over something like this is wrong.”

The Wood County Deputy Sheriff’s Association notified Wood County Sheriff Jeff Sandy about its decision to support Piggott. Graham said the association is lobbying for his reinstatement.

“I know many of our deputies have tattoos, and I think they are more socially acceptable now. I can’t think of anyone who would be offended by a tattoo,” said Graham. “The bottom line is, Chris is a fine young man and an asset to the sheriff’s office. His heart is in law enforcement.”

Piggott and his attorney George Cosenza have sent a letter to Sandy requesting reinstatement. A pre-disciplinary hearing was scheduled for May 19, but was postponed because several witnesses were unavailable, said Cosenza.

“I think there are legitimate issues that need to be resolved, and we are just in the beginning stages. Now that the sheriff has decided on punitive action, Piggott is entitled to a pre-disciplinary hearing,” said Cosenza. “There are issues regarding how he was notified of his termination and what exactly his status is now.”

Cosenza said Piggott was sent a letter of termination that advised him of his rights, and he is exercising his right to a pre-disciplinary hearing.

“If the review board believes punitive action should not be taken, the sheriff has a right to appeal to the civil service commission, and the same goes for Piggott. Depending on the outcome, the matter could end up in circuit court,” he said. “I do not believe a deputy sheriff can be fired without a pre-disciplinary hearing, and we have not yet had that hearing.”

Sandy said he could not comment on personnel issues under the advisement of Wood County Prosecutor Jason Wharton.

While Piggott awaits a decision, he has been working various construction jobs.

“I’m just trying to get reinstated. I’m a little nervous about the outcome,” Piggott said. “One of the big reasons I would feel comfortable going back to the department is because I know a lot of the deputies are backing me up.”

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